BP have revised China’s total historical CO2 emissions. They are now 5% higher.

Posted on Updated on

I pointed out a couple of days ago that BP had made significant revisions in the last year to China’s historical coal consumption. Here are there revisions I calculated then.

BP_Revisions

There are some big revisions and here. However, BP has not stated why the revisions are so big.

How does this translate into CO2 emissions? I hadn’t thought of checking, but Glen Peters has just tweeted a graph showing revisions.

The revisions, as you would expect, are very similar to the changes in coal consumption. What does it all stack up to? In total, BP have revised China’s historical CO2 emissions up by 7.9 billion tonnes. This means that China’s total historical (energy related) emissions from 1965 to 2013 have been revised upwards by 5.2%. For further perspective, China’s current annual emissions are 9.7 billion tonnes.

Exactly what these revisions mean is unclear. Some of the revisions are mind boggling. For example, China’s coal consumption in the years 2000 and 2001 are now 41.8 and 41.3% greater than was stated by BP in their 2003 statistical review.

Neither BP or China has a habit of telling you why such revisions are made. How about a little transparency?

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “BP have revised China’s total historical CO2 emissions. They are now 5% higher.

    Alexander Ač said:
    June 14, 2015 at 10:32 am

    Co that means coal emissions from other countries are smaller, if the global pool is the same (?)

    Like

Comments are closed.